Authors on submission – how to survive the waiting game

watched-pot-never-boils-900-by-350 by randon C Warren

Earlier this year I participated in the marvelous BookBound UK retreat, a tutoring scheme for promising, unpublished children’s writers. Many of us from BookBound, and many more of my SCBWI friends who attended the popular Agents Party, are currently on submission with our manuscripts, seeking representation from a literary agent, so I thought it might be time for a sensible blog about being sensible.

Being an unpublished author on submission to agents is only slightly less harrowing than being an unpublished author whose agent has her manuscript on submission to editors.

But these scenarios share one element: the waiting game.

Repeat after me:

The only way to survive the waiting game is not to play it.

That’s it. Don’t wait. Forget you have submitted a manuscript, and carry on writing something else.

“Impossible!” I hear you cry. “How can I forget that my baby has been set adrift in a boat with minimal provisions?”

But this impassioned statement mis-states the scenario. Your baby is not adrift in a boat. Your baby is in hyper sleep. It will not suffer from its state of suspended animation, but you might, if you continue to mis-comprehend the situation you’re in.

The situation is this: when you consider the entire universe of aspiring authors out there, vanishingly few debut authors are taken on by agents. Painfully few debut authors’ work is taken on by editors. The debut author’s manuscript is looking for someone to fall in love with it, but the game of love is a search that has ever been fraught with heartbreak.

So let me reiterate: don’t play the game. Read submission guidelines; submit; forget.

Repeat.

If you have a polished, promising manuscript, and if you keep submitting, it might just find its true love.

Just can’t forget?

If you find yourself unable to submit and forget, I hear you — I do. Try the following:

1) Get a cup of tea

2) Make a to-do list

3) Include on that list “check in with submissions”

4) Do not approach that item until the to-do items above it on the list have been completed, and do not approach that item more than once daily.

5) If you are worried that a nibble from an agent will go unseen, ask yourself whether that is a worry grounded in reality. The truth is, checking in with submissions once a day is acceptable. Checking three times an hour is madness-inducing. Trust me on this. Delaying your response to a nibble will not hurt your chances with that agent.

6) Remind yourself you’re hiring the agent, not the other way around. You are not seeking an employer. You are seeking a partner. Keep searching until you find the right partner, but devote an appropriate portion of your energies to the search. Believe me when I say that 95% is not an appropriate portion of your energies. We all know that a watched pot never boils, but aspiring authors on submission have a gut-level fear that tells them the unwatched pot will boil, burn dry and set the house on fire. Try to ignore this fear.

Remember: don’t play the game. Revisit that to-do list and its priorities. Your writing is one part of your life, it’s not the entirety of it.

 

 

Image courtesy Brandon C Warren on Flickr

How to get the best from a critique

hear no evil by SoCal Photo DesignCritiquing is never comfortable for a writer. Your ego and your dreams for the manuscript are on the line when you pass your work-in-progress to another person and ask for constructive feedback. But it’s a necessary evil – and, if you think about it, it’s not evil at all. Critiques are the route to making your story as clear and compelling as it can be. And that’s what you want, right?
Continue reading “How to get the best from a critique”